Craig Della Penna, Realtor® | Northampton Real Estate, Amherst Real Estate, Florence Real Estate


Before you embark on a search for your dream house, it helps to know what to expect during the homebuying journey. If you understand the true cost of purchasing a home, you can map out your property buying strategy accordingly.

Now, let's take a look at three factors that may impact how much you spend to acquire your ideal residence.

1. The Price of a Home

The initial asking price for a house is not necessarily set in stone. In some instances, you may be able to negotiate with a seller and receive a lower price.

However, regardless of the price you negotiate with a seller, you are responsible for paying for a residence. And if you fail to receive a mortgage, you may struggle to make your homeownership dream come true.

It often helps to get pre-approved for a mortgage. That way, you can enter the housing market with a budget in hand. Pre-approval for a mortgage also may enable you to speed up your home search and ensure you can quickly discover a residence that falls within your price range.

2. Closing Costs and Other Homebuying Fees

After a seller accepts your offer to purchase his or her home, there may be various fees that you'll need to pay to finalize your house purchase.

For instance, a buyer who conducts a home inspection will need to pay for this evaluation. He or she likely will need to pay for an appraisal and any closing costs as well.

As you get ready to pursue a house, you may want to put aside extra funds for any potential costs you may encounter throughout the homebuying cycle. Because if you have the necessary funds at your disposal, you may be better equipped than ever before to seamlessly navigate the homebuying journey.

3. Moving Expenses

After you buy a home, you will need to relocate all of your belongings to your new address. To do so, you probably will require moving boxes and packing supplies to ensure your personal belongings can safely reach your new house. As such, you should account for these expenses prior to starting a house search.

Of course, you may want to hire a moving company too. If you want to find out what it costs to hire professional movers, you may want to receive quotes from multiple local moving companies sooner rather than later.

If you need help getting ready to search for a home, a real estate agent is happy to assist you. A real estate agent can offer lots of insights into the potential costs you may encounter at each stage of the property buying journey. In addition, a real estate agent will help you narrow your search for your dream house, conduct home showings and much more.

Start planning for potential costs associated with the homebuying journey – you'll be glad you did. If you budget for the property buying journey, you could increase the likelihood of enjoying a quick, stress-free homebuying experience.


A home inspection report may prove to be a difference-maker for a property buyer, and for good reason. With an inspection report in hand, a property buyer will need to decide whether to proceed with a home purchase or rescind a homebuying proposal. Therefore, a property buyer must allocate time and resources to review a home inspection report so he or she can make an informed homebuying decision.

Ultimately, there are many reasons why a homebuyer should trust the final results of a property inspection report, and these reasons include:

1. A home inspection is conducted by a property expert.

A home inspection is conducted by a property expert who will perform a deep evaluation of a house. As such, a home inspector will provide a homebuyer with a comprehensive report that details his or her findings.

For homebuyers, it often is beneficial to search for a top-rated home inspector. This inspector likely will provide an in-depth report that outlines a house's strengths and weaknesses. A homebuyer then can use this report to make an informed decision about how to proceed with a house.

2. A home inspection is used to assess all aspects of a house.

A home inspection generally takes several hours to complete. During this evaluation, a home inspector will look at a home's foundation, heating and cooling systems and other aspects of a house. By doing so, a home inspector will be able to identify any underlying issues with a residence.

It usually is beneficial to ask questions during a home inspection as well. If you strive to learn from a home inspector, you can boost the likelihood of making the best-possible decision about whether a house is right for you.

3. A home inspection offers insights that property buyers may struggle to obtain elsewhere.

Although a homebuyer may visit a house more than once before submitting an offer to purchase, a home inspection represents a learning opportunity unlike any other. A house inspection enables a homebuyer to examine a residence both inside and out with a property expert. Then, this buyer will receive an extensive inspection report that he or she can review prior to finalizing a house purchase.

If you're preparing to search for a home, you may want to hire a real estate agent. This housing market professional will be able to guide you along the homebuying journey. And once you reach the point where you need to conduct a house inspection, a real estate agent will help you find a top home inspector in your city or town.

Of course, a real estate agent will respond to your homebuying concerns and questions too. As a result, a real estate agent will help you take the guesswork out of buying a house.

Ready to find and purchase a home? Before you finalize a house purchase, perform a home inspection – you'll be glad you did. Because if you review a home inspection report, you can determine the best course of action relative to a home purchase.


Experienced, knowledgeable real estate agents are experts in attracting potential buyers to home showings.

When you initially meet with prospective real estate agents to determine which one would be the best fit for your needs, you can get a pretty good sense of how marketing-savvy they are.

Since marketing is one of the most important parts of their job description, a well-trained, motivated real estate agent will know how to effectively use the Internet, their network of personal contacts, and a variety of other techniques to draw in qualified prospects.

Is there anything that you, as the homeowner, can do to help market your home?

Although it's your real estate agent's role to advertise, promote, and publicize your real estate listing to targeted groups and the general public, there is one huge thing you can do to help: Try to keep your house and property looking impeccable at all times. While that goal may be easier said than done, it's worth some extra time and effort to make your home as inviting and appealing to house hunters as possible.

Here are two ways you can increase your home's marketability and help spark more interest among prospective buyers:

  1. Meticulous neatness and cleanliness gives your home instant appeal. On the other hand, a messy, disorganized home or yard will send the wrong message to people touring your house. While it may be counterproductive to have your house reeking from ammonia and harsh cleaning chemicals, keeping countertops, floors, and walls clean will help your real estate agent present your home in its best possible light. Hopefully, you'll be able to enlist the help of everyone in the family (except pets) to clean up after themselves and keep their rooms and play areas looking civilized!
  2. Help maintain curb appeal! As the cliché goes (or was it an old mouthwash commercial?): "You don't get a second chance to make a great first impression!" For that reason, it's vitally important for your lawn to look well manicured and your house to be free from peeling paint and yard clutter. Another eyesore that detracts from first impressions is the sight of weeds growing out of cracks in your driveway or walkway. The cracks, themselves, are a problem you might want to address, but the weeds (or grass) poking through them is like adding insult to injury! If you don't want to spray them with some toxic, store-bought weed killer, then research natural ways to kill weeds.
Although your real estate agent will gladly handle 99% of the marketing for your home, you can help give their efforts an important nudge by making sure your home and property always look their best!

Photo by Wulfman65 via Shutterstock

When you’re thinking about purchasing a home, an old house versus that new one is something to ponder. If you’ve thought about buying an older home, consider each of these areas before making an offer. Have your agent write contingencies into your contract, and by all means, don’t forego an inspection.

Consider HazMat

Say what? A lot of folks don’t realize that over the years, materials routinely used in homebuilding fall out of favor and become potential issues when you decide to renovate or remodel your older home. Some examples of hazardous materials are:

  • Lead pipes. Once used for standard plumbing, even sealed lead pipes can eventually allow toxic lead to leach into your water. Replacing all the plumbing in your home is an extensive and expensive process entailing removing floors and walls, tearing out concrete, and digging up landscaping. Before making an offer, have the water tested for lead.
  • Lead pipes aren’t the only problem. Older homes often have lead paint as well. Although it may be painted over with a non-hazardous paint, if paints chip and reveal the older materials, you might be exposed to higher concentrations of lead than you realize.
  • Asbestos. Homes built before the 1980s often had asbestos in the ceiling texture and insulation. Removing asbestos is an expensive side cost to any renovation. In addition to interior asbestos, many homes have asbestos siding and roofing materials that require HazMat removal as well. If the existing materials remain in place, there’s no law against them, but if you disturb them to install an addition or reface your home, they require proper mitigation.

Structural Challenges

A common issue with older homes is damage to the foundation from years of shifting ground, water seepage and expansion, and improper additions. When more weight sits on a home, from a new roof installed over the top of the old one, for example, the extra weight puts stress on bearing walls and the foundation. Footers exposed to erosion from running water might not continue to carry that weight. You won’t notice it at first, but eventually, you’ll find yourself repairing cracks in the plaster more frequently. An experienced home inspector will detect potential problems, so pay attention to the inspector’s report about potential, future issues with a home.

Lastly, older homes have long-term exposure to pests. Termites, carpenter ants, and other wood-damaging pests can hide their damage from you, but an inspector knows where to look. Along with disclosure of asbestos and lead issues, insist on pest control mitigation in your contract for an older home. Let your agent know how old a home you’re willing to purchase to avoid these issues.



595 Haydenville Rd, Northampton, MA 01053

Single-Family

$389,000
Price

5
Rooms
3
Beds
1
Baths
Cute, small, custom-built ranch house in the Leeds section of Northampton. 5 rooms, 3 bedrooms and 1 bath. Looking for lots of 'shoulder room' so to speak? This is situated on over 12 acres of land with city owned conservation land to the right and a golf course to the left. There is a loooong narrow driveway off of Rt 9 that crosses over a small bridge to get to this house. Newer roof, newer Thermo-Pride furnace, along with electrical and plumbing updates since 2006. A 2-car garage w several other sheds. Lots of room for hobbies. There is also a perfect site for a ground mount solar array that could provide all the utility needs too. Large fenced and well maintained gardening area with full sun. Attic has completely new fiberglass insulation. Newer chimney with wood-stove insert which easily heats main living area, Newer septic system and well. New addition 2007 was built as sunporch.
Open House
No scheduled Open Houses

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